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Research

Informing and Shaping Best Practice.


At the Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) we work closely with clinicians, consumers and managers to design and promote better healthcare for NSW.

Research is important to ensure that clinical practice meets international standards, patients’ expectations and service-specific goals.

This research must be scientifically excellent, ethical, practice-relevant and translational. Such research is important for providing a strong and relevant evidence base for ACI initiatives.

ACI Research Funding Scheme

We are committed to supporting scientifically excellent ethical, practice-relevant and translational research. The research must inform and supports practical interventions and system-wide improvements in patient experiences and outcomes.

Researchers can approach ACI with expressions of interest requesting financial and in-kind support for their projects, or in-principle support for applications that will leverage additional funding from other sources of research funding, e.g. NHMRC Partnerships for Better Health projects and ARC Linkage Projects. To ensure ACI provides a fair review of all requests from researchers to support their work, and where our own budget permits, we will consider submissions twice per year, usually in February and September. 

More information on our strategic goals and priorities can be found in the ACI Research Framework: Responsible Governance, Management and Conduct of Research.

Current ACI-funded and Supported Projects

The research currently being undertaken by, on behalf of or in partnership with ACI, our staff and Clinical Network members is addressing a variety of areas of significance to the NSW Health system, including:

  • National Health and Medical Research Council Australia funded Partnerships for Better Health grant (ID: APP1056128; Title: Improving the Mental Health Outcomes of People with an Intellectual Disability), which is a larger collaborative project including academics, government and non-government organisations and people with intellectual disability. The broader Partnership work has several themes including Big Data, qualitative work examining barriers and enablers to access, and a national and state policy analysis. ACI, through the Intellectual Disability Health Network, is a partner in this work.
  • ‘Evaluation of the impact of routine glucose screening in Emergency Departments on detection of diabetes and subsequent diabetes care and patient outcomes’ (research being led by Dr Wah Cheung, University of Sydney in partnership with the ACI Endocrine Network)
  • ‘Improving the evidence-based care for locally advanced prostate cancer and the use of clinical networks to lead changes in clinical practice for high-risk patients in hospitals’ (research being led by A/Professor Mary Haines, the Sax Institute in partnership with the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, the Cancer Council, the Sax Institute, the University of Sydney and the ACI Urology Network)
  • ‘Review and contextualisation of the contributors to potentially preventable hospitalisations admissions in Australia, to guide understanding, interpretation and future use of this measure within the Australian health care’ (research being led by Professor Louisa Jorm, University of Western Sydney in partnership with the ACI Clinical Program Design and Implementation Portfolio)
  • ‘Development and evaluation of a comprehensive electronic decision support system for osteoporosis diagnosis, investigation and management’ (research being led by Professor John Eisman, Garvan Institute of Medical Research in partnership with the ACI Musculoskeletal Network)
  • ‘Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 (DESTINY 10-14): a population based study of Emergency Department utilisation and length of stay in New South Wales’ (led by Clinical Associate Professor Michael Dinh, University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Emergency Department
  • ‘Evaluation of the Paediatric Trauma System in New South Wales, Australia. Evidence to change policy and improve patient outcomes in children suffering major injury’ (led by Associate Professor Kate Curtis, School of Nursing, University of Sydney).
  • ‘Diagnosing Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations Project (DAPPHne)’ (led by Dr Megan Passey, University Centre for Rural Health – North Coast, University of Sydney).
  • ‘Examination of the external validity, effectiveness and outcomes of the Emergency Department four-hour rule as an intervention’ (research being led by Dr Robert Forero, University of NSW in partnership with the ACI Emergency Care Institute)
  • ‘Better understanding the most effective strategies for supporting policy agencies in the use of research to inform their programs (SPIRIT)’ (research being led by Professor Sally Redman, the Sax Institute in partnership with the ACI)

Resources