Communication toolkits

For more information about any of our communication toolkits please contact our Communication team at aci-communications@health.nsw.gov.au

Many young people with chronic health conditions arising in childhood are now living well into adulthood, which is increasing demand for adult services. Our Transition Care Network works to improve continuity of care for these young people (14 to 25 years of age), as they move from paediatric to adult health services.

The network brings together clinicians, health managers, young adults, families and carers to design and implement innovative ways to improve care delivery.

The ACI Transition Care Service, a statewide care coordination service supporting young people as they move into adult health services, is also available. It is aligned with Trapeze, a Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network transition care program.

To continue improving transition care for young people, the Transition Care Network is seeking the input, expertise and experiences of clinicians and consumers.

Please use these communication assets to:

  • help clinicians in the adult and paediatric health system understand the important role they play supporting young people transitioning to adult care, and encourage them to join the network
  • raise awareness among patients, their family and carers about the support provided by the network, and encourage them to join the network to share their lived experience.

Article for newsletters, websites and intranets

For health professionals and clinicians

How to support young people transitioning to adult health services

Being a young person is a time of change. For those with a chronic illness or disability, it can be even more challenging, especially as they transition from paediatric to adult health services.

Transitioning to adult care isn’t a one-off event; it’s a journey requiring the involvement and support of many different clinicians and services, working collaboratively with the young person, their family and carers.

The Agency for Clinical Innovation’s (ACI) Transition Care Network is encouraging clinicians with patients aged between 14 and 25 years to become familiar with best practice transition care.

Young people are best supported with an individualised transition plan that considers all aspects of their life. It’s important to:

  • prepare early and encourage self-management and involvement in decision making (if developmentally appropriate)
  • offer holistic care and build rapport by asking and understanding what matters to each individual person – this can make a big difference to a young person who is navigating new health services
  • consider and discuss the young person’s experiences and activities. For example, things such as alcohol and drug use; sexual activity; and increased independence through study, work and living arrangements are important.

This can all make care more effective and health outcomes better.

The Transition Care Network works with clinicians, health managers, young people, families and carers to design and implement innovative ways to improve the continuity of care as young people move to adult health services.

Involvement from clinicians, patients and carers can make a significant difference to advancing transition care practices to ensure the best outcomes for young people.

Access information, support and resources for delivering healthcare to young people transitioning to adult care by joining the network. Visit aci.health.nsw.gov.au/networks/transition-care

Article for newsletters, websites and intranets

For young people, their family or carers

Tips for young people transitioning to adult health services

Being a young person is a time of change. If you have a chronic illness or disability, it can be even more challenging while you transition from children’s to adult health services.

The Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) Transition Care Network is encouraging young people, their family and carers to learn more about what to expect when transitioning to adult services, including the support available.

Transitioning to adult care isn’t a one-off event; it’s a journey where a young person, their family and carers work collaboratively with many different clinicians and services to move into the adult health system.

Young people need an individualised transition plan that considers all aspects of their life. If you don’t have one already, ask your health services about it. It’s also important to consider and discuss the following:

  • Prepare early and, if you can, get involved with managing and making decisions about your own health.
  • Be honest with your health services. You might be trying new things that affect your health, such as alcohol or drug use and sexual activity; or becoming more independent through study, work and living arrangements.
  • Understand that your health services should consider all aspects of your life when giving health advice. Always ask questions and seek help when you need it.
  • Remember, it takes time; and it might take longer than you plan for.

The ACI Transition Care Network works to improve continuity of care as young people move to adult health services. The ACI runs a Transition Care Service, which is available to support you.

Input from patients, their family and carers can make a significant difference to advancing transition care services.

Join the ACI Transition Care Network to share your lived-experience. No other experience is necessary, and you’ll be joining others sharing their personal views. You can help ensure the best outcomes for young people in the health system.

Find out more and join the network on the ACI website to share your views.

Social media content

You can also share LinkedIn content or retweet content from @nswaci

For health professionals and clinicians

Option 1:

Your expertise can have a positive impact on the life of a young person with a chronic condition. Join the @nswaci #TransitionCare Network and help improve the experience of young people transitioning from paediatric to adult health services: https://bit.ly/transition-care-network

Option 2:

Do you have patients aged between 14 and 25 years? Learn how #TransitionCare can help you achieve the best health outcomes for these patients: https://bit.ly/transition-care-network

Option 2:

Transitioning to adult care isn’t a one-off event, it’s a journey. Clinicians work collaboratively with the young person and their support people to move them into the adult health system. Learn more https://bit.ly/transition-care-network

For young people, their family or carers

Option 1:

What do you wish the healthcare system knew about moving from children’s to adult health services?  Join the ACI’s #TransitionCare Network and make your voice heard: https://bit.ly/transition-care-network

Option 2:

What is your advice for young people with a chronic illness or disability when they are moving to adult health services? More info about @nswaci #TransitionCare and support: https://bit.ly/transition-care-network

Poster and digital screen

DL flyer (digital and print)

This flyer is for young people, their family and carers, or clinicians to share with their patients. It can be shared electronically or printed in-house.

Download Transition Care Network DL flyer for young people


Download Transition Care Service DL flyer for young people

About the ACI Transition Care Network

Extra information you can use in communications.

  • Many young people with chronic conditions arising in childhood are now living well into adulthood. This is increasing the demand for adult health services to manage these patients.
  • The Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) Transition Care Network was established in 2004. The network works to improve continuity of care for young people aged between 14 and 25 years with chronic health problems, moving from paediatric to adult health services.
  • The network brings together clinicians, health managers, young people, families and carers to design and implement innovative ways to improve the way care is delivered.
  • The network is led by an Executive Committee, including around 26 doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and consumers.
  • The network has more than 180 members, including clinicians, consumers and representatives from the NSW Ministry of Health, local health districts, specialty health networks, and government and non-government organisations.
  • The ACI also manages the Transition Care Service, which is a statewide care coordination service supporting young people as they move into adult health services. It is closely aligned with Trapeze; a Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network transition care program.
  • Network members are central to the success of the network; they:
    • can contribute to projects that make a real impact in the lives of young people
    • have the opportunity to participate in webinars, comment on important documents and provide advice on services
    • receive quarterly newsletters with important information about transitional care
    • can join the Executive Committee and working groups through an expression of interest process.
  • You can join the ACI Transition Care Network on the ACI website.

The NSW Health Award winning Alcohol and Drug Cognitive Enhancement (ACE) program is a ground-breaking intervention for people who are seeking treatment for their alcohol and drug use:

  • the program’s tools and resources allow clinicians to screen for and help improve a client’s brain function
  • improved brain function can help clients with things such as memory, planning, decision making and managing emotions
  • this can greatly increase the likelihood of remaining in, and benefiting from, treatment.

The ACE program is a collaboration between the Agency for Clinical Innovation’s Drug and Alcohol Network, Advanced Neuropsychological Treatment Services and We Help Ourselves.

Use these communications assets, for health professionals and for people seeking treatment, on your channels to increase awareness of the program.


Article and image for newsletters, websites and intranets

For health professionals and clinicians

ACE article tile for articles

Download image to use with article

Ground-breaking alcohol and drug program now available

The NSW Health Award winning Alcohol and Drug Cognitive Enhancement (ACE) program is a new way for clinicians to support people in NSW seeking treatment for their alcohol and drug use.

The program provides a set of tools and resources that allows clinicians to screen for and help improve a client’s brain function. This will enable clients to better engage with alcohol and drug treatment.

Program trials showed a large increase in the number of people completing drug and alcohol treatment and a reduction in brain function impairment.

Learn more on the Agency for Clinical Innovation website.

For people affected by alcohol and drug use

ACE program tile for public

Download image to use with article

Ground-breaking program for people affected by alcohol and drug use

A NSW Health Award winning program is available to health professionals who are treating people affected by alcohol and drug use.

The Alcohol and Drug Cognitive Enhancement (ACE) program screens for and helps improve brain function. This can help people remain in and benefit from alcohol and drug treatment.

Program trials showed a large increase in the number of people completing drug and alcohol treatment; and a reduction in brain function impairment.

Learn more on the Agency for Clinical Innovation website.


Social media content (Twitter)

For health professionals and clinicians

Option 1:

A ground-breaking new alcohol and drug program helps improve a client’s brain function, so they can better engage with and complete treatment. Learn about the @nswaci Alcohol and Drug Cognitive Enhancement #ACEProgram: http://bit.ly/aci-aceprogram

Option 2:

A ground-breaking new alcohol and drug program can help you support clients to complete treatment. Learn about the @nswaci Alcohol and Drug Cognitive Enhancement #ACEProgram: http://bit.ly/aci-aceprogram

ACE program tile for Twitter - Clinicians
Download Twitter tile
ACE program tile for LinkedIn - Clinicians
Download LinkedIn tile 
ACE program Facebook tile - Clinicians
Download Facebook tile
ACE program Instagram tile - Clinicians
Download Instagram tile

For people affected by alcohol and drug use

Option 1:

A ground-breaking new program helps make it easier to take on alcohol and drug treatment, by improving your ability to plan, make decisions and think clearly.  Ask your case manager about the @nswaci #ACEProgram https://bit.ly/about-ace

Option 2:

A ground-breaking new program has been shown to help people complete alcohol and drug treatment.  Ask your case manager about the @nswaci #ACEProgram https://bit.ly/about-ace

ACE program Twitter tile - Public 
Download Twitter tile
ACE program LinkedIn tile - Public 
Download LinkedIn Tile
ACE program Facebook tile - Public
Download Facebook tile
ACE program Instagram tile - Public
Download Instagram tile

Poster and digital screen

Digital fact sheet

This digital fact sheet can be accessed online, or be printed and distributed.

Aboriginal people who have a long stay in hospital following trauma, or a medical episode, face some unique challenges.

My rehab, my journey – Gadjigadji supports clinicians and health staff to create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people. The website provides information, case studies and videos that raise awareness of the challenges Aboriginal people face. Practical tools and resources help health workers assess their own knowledge of the issues and implement positive change across health services.

The resources have been developed with the Aboriginal community and health workers for use in rehabilitation wards and can be used in other areas of healthcare.

Please use the communication toolkit assets below to inform clinicians, health professionals and Aboriginal liaison officers about the resources and how they can be used to create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people.

* Gadjigadji is a Gamilaraay word meaning regrowth.

Short video (for use on websites, intranets, social media etc)

Article for newsletters, websites, intranets

Create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people

Aboriginal people who have a long stay in hospital following trauma, or a medical episode, face unique challenges. The new My rehab, my journey – Gadjigadji website provides information and practical resources to help clinicians and health staff create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people.

The resources can be used by rehabilitation services and in other areas of healthcare.

Services that have trialled the resources say their communication and relationships with Aboriginal patients have improved through important activities, such as yarning and using outdoor spaces. These types of individual or service-wide changes can help Aboriginal people stay engaged with health services, and ultimately improve a person’s experience and health outcomes.

How to get started

The resources have been developed by the Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) in partnership with Aboriginal clinicians and community.

Explore all the resources on the My rehab, my journey – Gadjigadji website.

* Gadjigadji is a Gamilaraay word meaning regrowth.


Images for newsletters, websites, intranets

Download image: 800 x 400 pixels

Download image: 1920 x 1280 pixels

Social media content

You can also retweet content from @nswaci

Twitter – Option 1
Aboriginal people who have a long stay in hospital face unique challenges. The new @nswaci #Gadjigadji resources help health professionals create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people: https://bit.ly/MyRehabMyJourneyGadjigadji

Twitter – Option 2
How culturally aware are you? Just starting out or totally deadly? Take this quick quiz and discover your knowledge and practice gaps in caring for Aboriginal people: https://bit.ly/GadjigadjiQuiz
@nswaci #Gadjigadi

LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram or internal social networks – Option 1
Aboriginal people who have a long stay in hospital face unique challenges. The new Gadjigadji resources from the Agency for Clinical Innovation help health professionals create a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people: https://bit.ly/MyRehabMyJourneyGadjigadji

LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram or internal social networks – Option 2
How culturally aware are you? Just starting out or totally deadly? Take this quick quiz and discover your knowledge and practice gaps in caring for Aboriginal people: https://bit.ly/GadjigadjiQuiz

Hashtags for use (Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram)
#Gadjigadi
#MyRehabMyJourney
#Rehabilitation
#CloseTheGap

Tiles for use,  or please use videos provided above


Download for Facebook (landscape): 1200 x 630 pixels

Download for Twitter: 1200 x 675 pixels

Download for Instagram or Facebook (square): 1080 x 1080 pixels

Download for LinkedIn: 1200 x 627 pixels

Poster, digital screen and Zoom/Teams background

For display in areas frequented by or on screens viewed by health professionals (e.g. screensavers). Can also be displayed in public areas such as wards, rehabilitation gymnasiums or waiting rooms.

Gadjigadji artwork poster

For print and display in wards.

Patient and carer brochure (folded A4 page)

Clinicians can share with their patients or clients by printing, or share electronically via email.

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