Fact sheetDiet specifications


General diet - halal

This document is part of the ACI Diet Specifications for Adult Inpatients. It is not to be used for patient education.

Aim

To provide a diet suitable for patients of Islamic faith.

Characteristics

Avoids all pork products and alcohol. All meat should be halal.

Indications

Available on request to Muslim patients.

Nutritional adequacy

Nutritionally adequate.

Precautions

Use only halal-certified meat and avoid gelatine, which is usually from non-halal animal sources. Avoid all pork products: this includes foods such as biscuits, pastry and cakes that may have pork fat added (pork fat may be labelled as animal fat). Avoid all food and ingredients containing alcohol. Avoid all animal fat except butter. Compliancy is to be based on ingredient compliancy and not provision of halal certification provided by manufacturers. It is not necessary to use separate cooking pots and utensils for halal food, provided adequate cleaning processes can be demonstrated. A food safety program should be able to demonstrate adequate separation of halal and haram foods.

Different denominations of Islam may have different views on which ingredients are halal or haram. Where this occurs we have coded to the strictest interpretation.

Paediatrics

Suitable for use in paediatrics when combined with an age-appropriate diet.

Specific menu planning guidelines

Allowed Not allowed
Hot main dishes

Beef, lamb, chicken killed by Muslim slaughter methods (halal)

All seafood, beans, eggs, cooked with water or with vegetable oils or margarine

Pork and pork products (e.g. ham, bacon, salami, sausages)

Foods containing alcohol

Sauces, graviesAll, prepared without animal fat Most stock powders with animal fat
Starchy vegetables / pasta / riceAll, cooked with water, vegetable fats or butterAny fried or roasted in animal fats
VegetablesAll, cooked with water, vegetable fats or butterAny fried or roasted in animal fats
SoupsAny made without pork, ham or animal fatsAny made with stock based on ham bones
SandwichesAny made with halal meat, seafood, eggs or cheesePork and pork products (e.g. ham, bacon, salami)
Salads, dressingsAny made with halal meat, seafood, eggs or cheese. Use vegetable oils in dressingsPork and pork products (e.g. ham, bacon, salami)
Breads, cerealsAll -
SpreadsVegetable margarine or butterMargarine made with animal fats
Hot breakfast choicesEggs, baked beans, vegetables, spaghettiPork products (e.g. ham, bacon, sausages)
FruitAll-
YoghurtYoghurt with halal gelatineYoghurt with regular gelatine
Desserts--
Milk and cheeseAll milk. cheese with halal rennetCheese with regular rennet.
BeveragesTea, coffee, soft drinks, cordial, pasteurised fruit juicesFresh fruit juices (because of perceived fermentation risk)
BiscuitsAny made with vegetable oils and fatsAny made with animal fats
Miscellaneous

Coconut milk, herbs and spices, pickles, chutney, vanilla bean

Nutritional supplements containing allowed ingredients

Flavour essences with alcohol base

Cochineal colouring (also called carmine, carminic acid, colour 120 or natural red 4)

References

  1. Australian Halal Food Directory.
  2. Dietitians Association of Australia. Nutrition manual. 8th ed. Canberra: DAA; 2009.
  3. Regenstein JM, Chaudry MM, Regenstein CE. The Kosher and Halal Food Laws. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf 2003;2:111-7.
  4. Riaz, M; Chaudry, M (2004) Halal Food Production.

Change log

Change date Section updatedChange
July 2019 Precautions Added Compliance is to be based on ingredient compliance, rather than provision of Halal certification provided by manufacturers
February 2022 Specific menu planning guidelines - Miscellaneous In Allowed, halal certified nutritional supplements replaced with Nutritional supplements containing allowed ingredients
In Not allowed, added after cochineal colouring (also called carmine, carminic acid, colour 120 or natural red 4)
References Added Riaz, M; Chaudry, M (2004) Halal Food Production.
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