Fact sheetDiet specifications

Published on 1 Nov 2011


Low saturated fat diet

This document is part of the ACI Diet Specifications for Adult Inpatients. It is not to be used for patient education.

Aim

To provide a diet low in saturated fat.

Characteristics

Reduced saturated fat and trans fatty acids, replaced by mono- and polyunsaturated fats and oils. For cholesterol-lowering diets, the intakes of soluble dietary fibre, omega-3 fatty acids, soy, plant sterols and stanols and nuts are increased, and foods high in salt are minimised.

Desired composition:

  • Saturated fat: <7% total energy
  • Main dishes and sandwiches: ≤5g saturated fat per serve
  • Desserts: <1.5g saturated fat per serve
  • Eggs: Up to six per week

Indications

  • patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease and / or with high cholesterol
  • patients with established cardiovascular disease.

Nutritional adequacy

Nutritionally adequate.

Precautions

None.

Paediatrics

Suitable for use in paediatrics when combined with an age-appropriate diet.

Specific menu planning guidelines

Allowed Not allowed
Hot main dishes

Main dishes ≤5g saturated fat per serve

Lean meat, skinless chicken, fish and eggs

Soy products, e.g. textured vegetable protein (TVP)

Legumes and beans

Fatty meats (e.g. bacon, sausages), offal

Deep-fried foods

Foods cooked in coconut milk

Sauces, gravies Low-fat sauces and gravies Cream-based sauces
Starchy vegetables / pasta / rice All raw, steamed, boiled, or roasted in small amounts of mono or polyunsaturated oils Fried or roasted vegetables with saturated fat, such as butter, cooking margarine, palm oil or dripping
Vegetables All raw, steamed, boiled, or roasted in small amounts of mono or polyunsaturated oils

Fried or roasted vegetables with saturated fat, such as butter, cooking margarine, palm oil or dripping

Vegetables served with cream-based or cheese-based sauces

Soups Low-fat soups (≤1.5g saturated fat per serve) Soups made with cream or full-fat milk
Sandwiches

Sandwiches ≤5g saturated fat per serve

Made with mono or polyunsaturated margarine

Butter
Salads, dressings

Salads ≤5g saturated fat per serve

Mayonnaise and dressings made with mono or polyunsaturated fats

Cream dressings
Breads, cereals Wholegrain and wholemeal varieties preferred Commercial pastries, cakes and biscuits made with butter or partially hydrogenated oils
Spreads Mono or polyunsaturated margarine Jam, honey, Vegemite™, peanut butter Butter
Hot breakfast choices

Boiled and scrambled eggs (note: limit to six eggs in total per week)

Mushrooms, baked beans, tomatoes

Fried eggs, bacon, hash browns
Fruit Fresh, canned and dried fruits -
Yoghurt Low-fat yoghurts Full-cream yoghurts
Desserts

Desserts with ≤1.5g saturated fat per serve

Low-fat ice-cream, custard and creamy rice

Tapioca, sago

Full-fat ice-cream or custard

Commercial cakes

Cream

Milk and cheese

Low-fat milk, skim milk

Soy milk

Low-fat cottage cheese and ricotta

Full-cream milk

Cream, sour cream

Full-fat cheeses (e.g. cheddar)

Beverages Water, tea, coffee, cordial, juices Full-fat milk
Biscuits Plain low-fat biscuits with ≤2g saturated fat per serve (e.g. Granita™, Shredded Wheatmeal™, Milk Coffee™, Milk Arrowroot™) Commercial biscuits made with butter or partially hydrogenated oils
Miscellaneous

Unsalted nuts and seeds

Herbs and spices

Salted nuts and seeds

Chocolate

References

  1. National Heart Foundation of Australia. Position statement: dietary fats and dietary sterols for cardiovascular health. 2009.
  2. Dietitians Association of Australia. Nutrition manual. 8th ed. Canberra: DAA; 2009.
  3. National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Position statement on lipid management – 2005. Heart Lung and Circulation 2005;14:275-91.
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