Fact sheetDiet specifications

Published on 1 Nov 2012


Fat diet - low saturated

This document is part of the ACI Diet Specifications for Paediatric Inpatients. It is not to be used for patient education.

Aim

To provide a low saturated fat intake.

Characteristics

Reduced saturated fat and trans fatty acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fats and oils need to be higher to reach standard energy needs. For cholesterol-lowering diets, the intakes of soluble dietary fibre, omega-3 fatty acids, soy and nuts are increased, and foods high in salt are minimised. Simple sugars are reduced.

Desired composition

Saturated fat: <7% total energy
Total fat: 30% total energy

Indications

Patients with familial hyperlipidaemia.

Nutritional adequacy

Nutritionally adequate.

Precautions

Note that mono- and polyunsaturated fats and oils need to be added to the diet to ensure adequate energy intake and beneficial ratio saturated: unsaturated fats. Plant sterol margarine is not recommended for children.

Specific menu planning guidelines

Allowed Not allowed
Hot main dishes

Main dishes ≤5g saturated fat per serve

Lean meat, skinless chicken, fish, eggs

Fish encouraged

Soy products (e.g. TVP)

Legumes and beans

Fatty meats (e.g. bacon, sausages)

Fat on meat

Skin on chicken

Offal

Deep fried foods

Foods cooked in coconut milk

Sauces, gravies

Low fat sauces and gravies

Cream-based sauces

Starchy vegetables/pasta/rice

All raw, steamed or boiled

Dressing of mono- or polyunsaturated oil

Roasted in mono- or polyunsaturated oil

Fried/roasted vegetables with saturated fat such as butter, cooking margarine, palm oil or dripping

Noodles high in fat

Vegetables

All raw, steamed or boiled

Dressing of mono- or polyunsaturated oil

Roasted in mono- or polyunsaturated oil

Offer legumes/baked beans

Fried/roasted vegetables with saturated fat such as butter, cooking margarine, palm oil or dripping

Vegetables served with cream- or cheese based sauces

Soups Low fat soups ( ≤1.5g saturated fat per serve)

Soups made with cream or full-fat milk or coconut milk

Sandwiches

≤ 5g saturated fat per serve

Made with mono- or polyunsaturated
margarines

Butter

Cheese

High fat processed meats such as salami, devon, chicken loaf

Salads, dressings

≤ 5g saturated fat per serve

Mayonnaise and dressings made with mono or
polyunsaturated fats

Cream dressings

Breads, cereals

Wholegrain and wholemeal varieties preferred

Rolled oats made on water or reduced fat milk

Commercial pastries, cakes and biscuits made with butter or partially hydrogenated oils

Spreads

Mono- or polyunsaturated margarines
Vegemite™, peanut butter

Butter

Margarines high in plant sterols and stanols

Hot breakfast choices

Boiled and scrambled eggs

Mushrooms, baked beans, tomatoes

Fried eggs

Bacon

Hash browns

Fruit

Fresh/canned/dried fruits

Juice (limit to 200mL per day)

Avocado

Fruit cakes or pastries made with butter or partially hydrogenated oils

Yoghurt

Low fat yoghurts

Full-cream yoghurts

Desserts

Dessert with ≤1.5g saturated fat per serve

Low fat ice-cream, custards and creamy rice

Tapioca, sago

Full-fat ice-cream or custards

Commercial cakes

Cream

Milk and cheese

Low fat milk, skim milk

Soy milk

Low fat cottage cheese/ricotta

Full-cream milks

Cream, sour cream

Full-fat cheese (e.g. cheddar)

Beverages

Water

Diet cordials (limit)

Juice (limit to 200mL per day)

Full-fat milk
Biscuits

Plain low fat biscuits with ≤ 2g saturated fat per serve (e.g. Granita™, Shredded Wheatmeal™, Milk Coffee™, Milk Arrowroot™, water crackers, rice/corn cakes, crackers)

Mono- or polyunsaturated spread on crackers as appropriate

Commercial biscuits made with butter or
partially hydrogenated oils

Miscellaneous

Unsalted nuts (e.g. almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios) and seeds

Herbs and spices

Salted peanuts and seeds

Chocolate

Plant sterols and stanols

References

  1. Agency for Clinical Innovation. Nutrition standards for paediatric inpatients in NSW hospitals. Sydney 2011.
  2. Agency for Clinical Innovation. Nutrition standards for adult inpatients in NSW hospitals. Sydney 2011.
  3. Dietitians Association of Australia. 2009. Nutrition Manual 8th ed. Canberra: DAA.
  4. American Dietetic Association. Paediatric Nutrition Care Manual. Chicago: ADA.
  5. National Heart Foundation of Australia. 2009. Dietary fats and dietary sterols for cardiovascular health.
  6. National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Position Statement on Lipid Management – 2005. Heart Lung and Circulation 2005;14:275-291.
  7. Shaw V and Lawson M. 2007. Clinical Paediatric Dietetics. 3rd Edition. Blackwell Publishing.
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