Fact sheetDiet specifications

Published on 1 Nov 2019


General diet - high fibre and lower fat

This document is part of the ACI Diet Specifications for Adult Inpatients. It is not to be used for patient education.

Aim

To provide a diet that is high in fibre and lower in total fat than the Full diet for people who are at risk of or who are overweight or obese, or who have metabolic syndrome.

Characteristics

A diet that conforms to the Nutrition standards for consumers of inpatient mental health services in NSW with 20–35% energy from total fat, high fibre (30g/day), and low saturated and trans fat (<10% energy/day).

Indications

  • Mental health illness
  • Overweight, obesity
  • Metabolic syndrome.

This diet may also be suitable to support recovery for people needing long term rehabilitation including after spinal injury.

Nutritional adequacy

This diet is nutritionally adequate.

Precautions

A generous intake of fluid (at least two to three litres per day) should accompany a high-fibre diet. Not to be used for people who require individual diet modification for treatment (e.g. eating disorders, malnutrition).

Paediatrics

Suitable for use in paediatrics when combined with an age-appropriate diet.

Specific menu planning guidelines

 Allowed Not allowed
Hot main dishes

Dishes with ≤15g total fat and ≤10g saturated fat per serve

Vegetarian dishes may contain <25g total fat per serve.

Lean meats, skinless chicken, all fish, eggs

Soy products, e.g. tofu, textured vegetable protein (TVP)

Cooked legumes

Fatty meat, offal

Deep-fried foods and shallow fried meals

Sauces, gravies Sauces and gravies with ≤1.5g saturated fat per serve Cream based sauces
Starchy vegetables / pasta / rice

Dishes prepared without added fat, or made with small amounts of mono or polyunsaturated oil/margarine (e.g. mashed and steamed potato, sweet potato)

Use low-GI rice (e.g. basmati or Doongara) where possible (see GI website for full list)

Noodles, polenta, semolina, quinoa, couscous

All others, including dishes prepared with butter, cream or full fat cheese
Vegetables Vegetables that are raw, steamed, boiled or roasted and prepared with small amounts of mono or polyunsaturated oil All others, including dishes prepared with butter, cream or full fat cheese
Soups Soups with ≤1.5g saturated fat per serve >1.5g saturated fat per serve
Sandwiches

Sandwiches with ≤15g fat and ≤7g saturated fat per serve

Preferably made with mono-unsaturated margarine, but polyunsaturated also allowed

Sandwiches made on high fibre white, wholemeal or multigrain bread

Sandwiches with >15g fat and >7g saturated fat per serve

Plain white bread

Butter

Salads, dressings

All salads ≤10g saturated fat per serve

Low-joule dressings, or dressings made with mono or polyunsaturated oils

All salads >10g saturated fat per serve
Breads, cereals

High fibre white, wholegrain or wholemeal breads (preferably grainy low-GI breads) are default

Fruit/raisin bread

Higher-fibre breakfast cereals only (e.g. rolled oats, muesli, bran cereals, Guardian®, wheat biscuits)

At least two low-GI cereal choices per breakfast (see GI website for full list)

Plain white bread

Highly sugared breakfast cereals

Spreads

Jam, yeast spread, honey, marmalade, nut butters/pastes (1 portion control unit of spread per meal in addition to margarine)

Preferably mono-unsaturated margarines, oils or mayonnaise, but polyunsaturated also allowed

Hummus, tzatziki, tahini, avocado

Saturated fats (e.g. butter, shortening, lard,
cooking margarine)
Hot breakfast choices

Hot breakfast items with ≤5g saturated fat per serve (e.g. boiled, poached or scrambled egg and omelettes)

Mushrooms, baked beans, tomatoes, spaghetti and creamed corn

These items limited to once per week: pancakes, hotcakes or waffles

Hot breakfast items with >5g saturated fat per serve

Fatty or deep fried breakfast items e.g. fatty bacon

Fruit Fresh, dried, frozen or canned fruit (unsweetened in natural juice or water) Canned fruit in syrup
Yoghurt All yoghurts with ≤5g saturated fat per serve
(e.g. plain, natural or flavoured)
All others
Desserts

Band 1 and 2 desserts with ≤3g saturated fat per serve

One Band 3 dessert offered no more than once per week

Low-fat ice-cream (no more than twice per week)

Diet jelly

Desserts with >3g saturated fat per serve

Full-fat ice-cream

High-fat and sugar pastries and pies

Regular jelly and jellied fruit

Milk and cheese

Allow all milk at all meals.

Encourage lower fat or skim milk where possible

Full fat dairy alternatives e.g. soy beverage

Low fat soft cheese (e.g. ricotta and cottage cheeses)

Hard cheese ≤5 gram total fat per serve

Full-fat soft cheeses and cheese spreads

Hard cheese with >5g total fat per serve

Beverages

Water, milk and dairy alternative beverages
(including flavoured), low-joule carbonated drinks, low joule cordial, plain mineral water

Encourage lower fat or skim milk where possible

Fruit juice without added sugar (maximum 1 serve per day)

Tea and coffee, including decaffeinated

Regular carbonated drinks and cordial, flavoured mineral water, alcoholic drinks, full fat milk drinks, energy drinks
Biscuits

Plain low-fat biscuits and crackers with ≤2g saturated fat per serve

Biscuits and crackers with >1.5g fibre per serve are preferred

Limit sweet biscuits to once per day

Cream or chocolate biscuits
Miscellaneous

All herbs and spices, pepper

Salt (limited to 1 sachet per meal)

Nuts (unsalted)

Sugar (limit to 1 sachet with cereal and 1 sachet per serve of hot beverage)

Artificial sweeteners

Cream, sour cream

Potato crisps

Chocolate

References

  1. NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation. Nutrition standards for consumers of inpatient mental health services in NSW. Sydney: ACI; 2013
  2. Dietitians Association of Australia. Nutrition manual. 9th ed. Canberra: DAA; 2014.
  3. National Health and Medical Research Council (2013) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council.
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